Conference Sessions

GFOA’s Annual Conference will include more than 75 concurrent sessions featuring leading practitioners, subject matter experts, and top researchers. Each session will contain a panel of speakers carefully selected to provide best practice guidance, discussion of current events, case studies, debate, and interactive exercises to cover a complete suite of topics pertinent for finance officers of all types and representing all forms of state and local governments. GFOA’s concurrent sessions will be organized into separate “core” tracks that focus on essential elements within public financial management. GFOA will also place an emphasis on emerging topics that provide finance officers with information critical to supporting their organizations and communities in today’s current environment.

GFOA is currently developing sessions and they will be added as they are finalized. Topic and sessions suggestions are encouraged through GFOA's call for topics.

A sampling of sessions is listed here. A complete list of sessions along with speakers and specific times for each session will be announced in January 2019.

30 Sessions

Pages


Ten years after the Great Recession, the market landscape has changed significantly for local governments. As interest rates continue to grow, local governments may begin to reevaluate their existing investment policies.

Just about every organization has something called a strategic plan, but few truly have a plan to use that information in a strategic way throughout the budget process.

Even as online procurement mediums and purchasing card technology has significantly evolved in recent years, implementation of a comprehensive P-card function can still be challenging from a process, technology, and management perspective.

Budgeting requires funding services to meeting community conditions. For most governments, the traditional budget process supports maintaining the status quo, but this is not always appropriate.

Every local government finance officer worries about fraud both internal and external to the Finance office. Fraud and counterfeiting schemes continue to pop up around the country, leaving many local governments searching for ways to protect themselves.