Financial Policy Drives Outcomes in Boulder

Thursday, February 25, 2016

The implementation of financial policies often yields strong, positive results for local governments over time. The City of Boulder, Colorado, is an example – the use of financial policies allowed the city to identify the best courses of action, establish parameters in which the government would operate, and develop standards to use in judging the government’s fiscal performance. 

Successful financial polices share one quality: a strong and easily definable framework. For its policies, Boulder created a framework of categories that included scope, objective, standard of care, and safekeeping/custody. These priorities were then applied to specific areas such as financial reporting, the city’s investment portfolio, and pooled fund management. 

The key was to be explicit. For instance, the city specifies the types of financial assets available for investment, excluding bank checking accounts, pensions, bond proceeds, and reserves. This step limits the scope of funds available for investment and provides guidance about the types of investment opportunities will be pursued. Policies also address safety, liquidity, and yield (in that order), providing further structure and order to Boulder’s financial management. Where possible, the city uses language that allows policies to achieve multiple objectives (e.g., maximize yield while also accounting for safety and liquidity), creating greater effectiveness and efficiency. 

Pooled fund policies are explicit about both the city’s desire to maximize returns by pooling funds with other government investments and pinpointing how returns will allocated. The city identifies the types of investments that are acceptable for state funds, specifying classification, maturity, and rating (where applicable). 

In conjunction with its annual budget, Boulder publicly releases an operating budget guiding principles document, which outlines the city’s goals, the intended uses of the budget, and the parameters the city will follow in working to achieve the these goals. Key features of Boulder’s operating budget include a focus on priority-based budgeting (which matching ongoing costs to ongoing revenues and one-time costs to one-time revenues). The operating budget also forecasts finances five years into the future.

The city’s investing, financial reporting, and operating budget policies highlight three important a jurisdiction can strengthen its financial planning and management. Using this approach, Boulder has earned and maintained an AAA general obligation bond rating, indicating the impact that financial policies can have on community’s extended fiscal soundness.

For more information please see the City of Boulder’s website.

Related Training:

Related Publications:

Related Best Practices/Advisories:

 



Financial Policy Drives Outcomes in BoulderThe implementation of financial policies often yields strong, positive results for local governments over time. The City of Boulder, Colorado, is an example – the use of financial policies allowed the city to identify the best courses of action, establish parameters in which the government would operate, and develop standards to use in judging the government’s fiscal performance. Successful financial polices share one quality: a strong and easily definable framework. For its policies, Boulder created a framework of categories that included scope, objective, standard of care, and safekeeping/custody. These priorities were then applied to specific areas such as financial reporting, the city’s investment portfolio, and pooled fund management. The key was to be explicit. For instance, the city specifies the types of financial assets available for investment, excluding bank checking accounts, pensions, bond proceeds, and reserves. This step limits the scope of funds available for investment and provides guidance about the types of investment opportunities will be pursued. Policies also address safety, liquidity, and yield (in that order), providing further structure and order to Boulder’s financial management. Where possible, the city uses language that allows policies to achieve multiple objectives (e.g., maximize yield while also accounting for safety and liquidity), leading to greater effectiveness and efficiency. Pooled fund policies are explicit about both the city’s desire to maximize returns by pooling funds with other government investments and pinpointing how returns will allocated. The city identifies the types of investments that are acceptable for state funds, specifying classification, maturity, and rating (where applicable). In conjunction with its annual budget, Boulder publicly releases an operating budget guiding principles document, which outlines the city’s goals, the intended uses of the budget, and the parameters the city will follow in working to achieve the these goals. Key features of Boulder’s operating budget include a focus on priority-based budgeting (which matching ongoing costs to ongoing revenues and one-time costs to one-time revenues). The operating budget also forecasts finances five years into the future.The city’s investing, financial reporting, and operating budget policies highlight three important a jurisdiction can strengthen its financial planning and management. Using this approach, Boulder has earned and maintained an AAA general obligation bond rating, indicating the impact that financial policies can have on community’s extended fiscal soundness.For more information please see the City of Boulder’s website.
Related Trainings• Best Practices and Effective Budget Presentation• Best Practices in Budgeting and Fiscal Policy• Budgeting Best PracticesRelated Publications:• Improving the Budget Process• Oakland County Emphasizes Long-Term Planning over Immediate FixesRelated Best Practices/Advisories:• Recommended Budget Practices from the National Advisory Council on State and Local Budgeting


Correction: PAFR Award WinnersThe listing of GFOA’s Popular Annual Financial Reporting Awards Program winners, published February 19, failed to include the jurisdictions from the State of Missouri. Following are the winners from that state:Bi-State Development Agency of the Missouri-Illinois Metropolitan District, Blue Spring, Creve Coeur, Des Pere, Jefferson, Kansas City, Maryland Heights, Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District, Missouri State Employees’ Retirement System, Richmond Heights, Webster Groves


GFOA Announces Canadian Award for Financial Reporting Winners for Fiscal Year Ended in 2014AlbertaCity of Airdrie, City of Brooks, City of Calgary, City of Edmonton, City of Lethbridge, City of Medicine Hat, City of St. Albert, County of Lethbridge, County of Newell, Parkland County, Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo, Strathcona County, Sturgeon County, Town of Stony Plain, Town of TaberBritish ColumbiaCity of Abbotsford, City of Burnaby, City of Coquitlam, City of Duncan, City of Fort St. John, City of Kamloops, City of Kelowna, City of Maple Ridge, City of Port Alberni, City of Port Moody, City of Richmond, City of Salmon Arm, City of Surrey, City of Vernon, City of Victoria, Corporation of the City of Port Coquitlam, Corporation of the District of Central Saanich, Corporation of the District of North Cowichan, Corporation of the District of Pitt Meadows, Corporation of the District of Saanich, District of Coldstream, District of Kent, District of Lake County, District of Mission, District of Sechelt, District of West Vancouver, Sunshine Coast Regional District, Town of Oliver, Town of SidneyNew BrunswickCity of MonctonNorthwest TerritoriesCity of YellowknifeOntarioCity of Greater Sudbury, City of Mississauga, City of Toronto, Corporation of the City of Brampton, Corporation of the City of Brantford, Corporation of the City of Markham, Corporation of the Town of Oakville, County of Wellington, Regional Municipality of Durham, Regional Municipality of Halton, Regional Municipality of Niagara, Regional Municipality of Peel, Regional Municipality of York, Town of Caledon, Town of Milton, Town of Niagara-on-the-LakeSaskatchewanCity of Prince Albert, City of ReginaYukonCity of Whitehorse
Thanks to the Canadian Award for Financial Reporting Program ReviewersCathy An, Finance Manager, Corporate Financial Reporting, The City of Calgary, Alberta; Mark Beauparlant, Manager, Corporate Financial Services, City of Mississauga, Ontario; Kris Boland, Manager of Finance, District of Mission, British Columbia; Archie G. Johnston, Partner KPMG Government Services, Burnaby, British Columbia; Aleks Nelson, Senior Financial Advisor, Alberta Municipal Affairs; Chris Parkins, Manager, Financial Advisory, Alberta Municipal Affairs; Antonella Risi, Principal, Public Sector Accounting, CPA Canada; Scott Ross, Manager of Accounting Services – Finance Department, District of Mission, British Columbia; Curtis Smith, Manager, Policy & Risk Management, Finance Department, Regina, Saskatchewan; Peggy Tollett, Treasurer, Town of Caledon, Ontario; Kevin Travers, Audit Partner, KPMG, Toronto, Ontario; Theresa Trott, Finance & Payroll Analyst, Town of Gravenhurst, Ontario; Mike Veenbaas, Director of Financial Services, Fraser Valley Regional District, British Columbia; Kaleigh Wills, Manager of Financial Reporting and Accounting Services, City of Winnipeg, Manitoba



Engaging Residents Can Transform Distressed NeighborhoodsThe lack of affordable housing, combined with the ongoing challenges associated with older, obsolete, and rundown housing, have resulted in distressed neighborhoods that offer little opportunity for residents. Evaluating the Role of Local Government and Project Stakeholder Engagement in Choice Neighborhoods Transformation Planning and Implementation, a new research report published by the International City/County Management Association (ICMA) explores the role of local governments and citizen engagement in transforming distressed neighborhoods. Chief among the report’s findings is that local governments need to consider the economic and social needs of public housing residents to ensure successful transformation of the greater neighborhood. Traditional neighborhood improvement planning focuses largely on the built environment. Based on the three report case studies, however, improving the lives of public housing and neighborhood residents requires strategic planning around the delivery of social and economic services as well. http://icma.org/en/icma/knowledge_network/documents/kn/Document/307994/E...


Tips for Government TweetsEncouraging talented employees to tweet about what’s going on in the jurisdiction is a great way to keep a government’s social presence authentic and compelling – but policies and education are obviously needed. An article from Careers in Government provides tips including how to find the experts, make the best use of their Twitter talents, and establish effective social media polices.https://www.careersingovernment.com/tools/gov-talk/about-gov/education/t...


Innovative Approaches Get Things Done in Two CitiesOne way to provide valuable services in these days of constrained resources is to try something new. For instance, in its first six months, the City of Detroit’s Improve Detroit smartphone app was downloaded more than 6,500 times, and more than 10,000 complaints made via the app have been closed, the Smart Cities Council reports. Another approach, from Schenectady, New York, is to “borrow” the expertise of GE retirees from nearby Wise Labs, which connects experienced scientists and engineers to businesses and investors who can help them take their innovations to market.http://smartcitiescouncil.com/


Cities Encourage Green Roofs for Stormwater ImprovementsGreen roofs are seeing a resurgence in popularity, in part because of their many benefits – they last 200% to 400% longer than a standard roof, create energy and stormwater control savings that pay for the cost of the roof in as little as five to six years, and can generate energy cost savings of 25% to 50%, according to ConstructionDive. But the best reason may be the tax and fee incentives that many cities are offering because of a green roof's ability to control stormwater runoff. “The average green roof absorbs 50% to 65% of average rainfall in most places, and this can save a city millions in stormwater improvements,” according to the website.http://www.constructiondive.com/news/can-green-roofs-bloom-into-cost-sav...


A Smart Approach to Downtown Waste ManagementIn an effort to keep streets cleaner and encourage more recycling, the City of Birmingham, England, worked with a third party to install smart trash bins in the city center. The larger bins allow the city to reduce the number of trash collections needed by 64%, and the bins’ sensor technology alerts the city when the bin is full, as well as monitoring peak times and places for litter, which allows officials to target resources and maximize recycling efforts.http://www.birminghammail.co.uk/news/midlands-news/mapped-new-recycling-...


Delaware Program Helps Create Pipeline of Skilled WorkersMany communities are concerned about creating more jobs and making sure their citizens have the skills to fill those positions. One way the State of Delaware is trying to create a pipeline of skilled workers is by creating a dual enrollment program for Delaware high school juniors and seniors, called the Pathways to Prosperity initiative, Brookings reports. Students are given help, in the form of partnerships, industry-recognized credentials, and highly-qualified graduates, to complete high school and attain postsecondary credentials that lead to jobs.http://www.brookings.edu/blogs/brown-center-chalkboard/posts/2015/11/06-...


Small City Operates Entirely on Solar PowerThe City of North Adams, Massachusetts, now powers its municipal buildings and infrastructure – including City Hall, the library, schools, street lights and a public skating rink – use only solar power, according to iBerkshires (via CitiScope). http://www.iberkshires.com/story/50111/North-Adams-Cuts-Cord-at-Solar-Ar...


7 WAYS GOVERNMENT CAN TELL BETTER (TECH) STORIESGovernment technology isn’t the kind of topic that generally makes national news, unless something has gone horribly wrong. We don’t often hear how well a system is running — until it isn’t — or what life-transformational IT services agencies provide for citizens, unless journalists bring it light or it’s part of some larger administrative initiative.I’ve always wondered why agencies aren’t more vocal about the great work they do. I once heard a govie say his office doesn’t want to seem too self-promoting. But if you don’t tell your story, who will? And if you don’t shape your story, someone else will. There are a number of great IT blogs created by and for government, but I know there are many more stories that go untold.Maybe you don’t know where to start, or what to share. Maybe you don’t have a robust communications department. Whatever the reason, I’ve compiled these quick tips to help you tell better stories. I focus on tech, but these tips apply to all of government.1. Be direct. Tech writers are always looking for good stories to tell. Get to know the community of writers who cover your agency and the topics you and the writers care about. Some agencies are better than others at identifying those writers and alerting them about major and seemingly minor developments. Some agencies host monthly or quarterly roundtables to share updates with reporters about their IT initiatives or field questions about ongoing work. There’s usually a set time period for these roundtables, and sometimes participants are asked to submit questions ahead of time. If time permits, they are usually allowed to ask off-topic questions. These events can be virtual or in-person.2. Share your unique story. There are things unique to your mission that your agency does well. If your agency launched a new project or initiative or made improvements in certain areas, share those stories. It’s hard to get a reporter jazzed about a run-of-the-mill project or event, so look for what’s new, unique, better, innovative and play that up.3. Make it plain. One of the biggest turnoffs about government IT stories is they include too much jargon and don’t get to the heart of why the story matters and how people are impacted. I know there are the buzzwords you can’t escape: cloud, big data, and the list goes on. If you can explain what new capabilities are provided and how they help people do their jobs better or improve quality of life for citizens, that’s the important part. I appreciate fact sheets that the White House and other agencies provide that plainly explain what’s new, why it matters and sometimes even next steps.4. Let’s get visual. Graphics, photos and charts are great additions to any story. They provide another dimension and in many ways enhance the story. These visuals are helpful for journalists interested in sharing your agency’s story, and they also help to quickly summarize or illustrate the issue. If you have stats or historical data to support the story, you should include them.5. Go social. Many agencies are already on social media and using these channels to promote the good work they do. You can also use social media to field questions from the public about the kinds of stories they want to hear. Some agencies use quiz questions to get the public engaged and excited about their agencies’ mission. You can use those questions as an opportunity to follow up with a story about current projects and how they impact citizens.6. Be creative. Think outside the box when it comes to storytelling. A long-form story with 600 words isn’t the only way. You can use vignettes, a Q&A or an illustration to tell your story. You can do a quick video interview with people close to the project or initiative. Maybe you can do a first-person account of their experiences working on a project, or interview a citizen or user who has benefited from your agency’s services.7. Be available. Don’t alert the public/press about a new initiative or project and not have staff or an expert available to talk about it. Speaking from personal experience, it’s helpful when agencies host a Q&A or short roundtable with reports either before or after the release of new information. One of the benefits is you can clear up any misunderstandings and add context to what has already been published. Releasing clear and concise information upfront helps to cut down on confusion.https://www.govloop.com/7-ways-government-can-tell-better-tech-stories/?...


HeadlineNovember is upon us and we have little more than six months until late spring brings another wave of fresh interns to the nation’s capital. It’s not too early to begin assessing your organization’s need for spring and summer interns. The are some very well-known and practical benefits of hiring interns – inexpensive (or free) labor, additional help with projects, and seasonal availability in the summer when regular staff tend to take vacation. Of course, there are also challenges – mid-level staff will need to provide interns with supervision on tasks, orientation to programs and policies, and training in more specialized duties. There are, however, hidden benefits to hiring interns that can impact your organization for years to come.Here are three reasons why you need interns…now. And they may not be the reasons you expect.1. Fresh perspectiveWe have probably all heard the uninspiring justification that, “That’s the way we’ve always done it.” Fortunately, interns start with a fresh slate. To someone completely new to an organization, there is no “always.” Some will see this fact as inexperience, but it is much more. While interns are being trained on office processes is an excellent time to reassess those processes. Offices that work together form systems and processes to deliver projects and programs. Sometimes those systems don’t function optimally and the people most familiar with them may be too tangled in the day to day operations to take a step back and assess the system and where it is weak. I often ask new interns in my office to learn a workflow for a specific kind of project, and then critique it. They may not always have the inside knowledge to go into depth, but they can usually identify redundancies or introduce new ideas. Their fresh perspective serves as one of many resources in crafting programs and processes. Interns not only enjoy learning experiences, they create them, too.2. Management experience for permanent staffFor the permanent staff who manage the interns’ daily work, it is easy to feel as though additional duties are piling on top of an already busy schedule. Interns do contribute, but there is a lot to do for the staff who manage them: train and mentor the intern, task them with projects, review their work and provide useful feedback. But that experience is another often overlooked benefit of having interns on your staff. The skills they learn and practice while developing interns can help prepare permanent staff for roles that require personnel management skills. In fact, having an intern shadow mid- or senior-level staff is not only a great opportunity for the intern. Permanent staff can practice mentoring, effective and clear tasking, and giving productive feedback. Staff can gain these invaluable management skills through helping interns to thrive.3. Build your talent pipeline and networkThis is one of the longer-term benefits of hiring interns: they can grow into progressively senior positions and bolster your talent pipeline. If you hire a more senior person later, when a mid-level position opens up five years from now, and train them in the specifics of your programs, you will be training a much more highly paid newcomer who will need to produce results fairly quickly. Filling that same position with a former intern who has learned the business from the bottom up, and who is ready for more responsibility, could mean a shorter learning curve and seeing results more quickly. What’s more, all their training for the higher level job would have been distributed over their career at your organization, meaning your investment in training for a mid-level job would be spaced out over months or years. For this strategy, it’s essential to plan with the intern her or his development path from junior staff into mid-level and beyond. I have been lucky to work with some rising stars who have taken this path, and it has been mutually beneficial to former-intern and organization.Of course, it doesn’t always work out that way. So what happens if the intern moves on? Is it still worth the investment? Your permanent staff has gained management skills and interns who leave on good terms may return later in their careers, with wider experience. If not, you have expanded your organization’s network by one more person who will carry a fondness for the office that launched her or his career. And a good network is priceless.So, as you plan your staffing needs, keep in mind these three hidden benefits of hiring interns that could make a big impact for your organization in the long-term.https://www.govloop.com/community/blog/3-surprising-reasons-office-needs...


Become smarter by stretching – not increasing – your infrastructureThink you need to greatly expand your city’s infrastructure? You may have nearly twice as much as you need. Surprised? Data and innovations that are already starting to appear are working to make that true.The pace of change in cities is accelerating with the proliferation of mobile devices, according to Carlo Ratti, director of the MIT Senseable City Laboratory. Just 30 years after the first real-world mobile devices appeared, we now have 5 billion in use – nearly one for every person on Earth. And soon, there could be 50 billion.Ratti says it’s not just the addition of the devices, change is driven by how those devices are used. We’ve gone from using them for person-to-person communication to connecting people with data. Growth will occur in communications between people and machines and, eventually, machines and machines.“Almost every atom of our individual space is becoming a sensor and an actor,” Ratti said during a keynote presentation at Smart Cities Week. He says that transformation is resulting in amazing new insights. Those insights have the potential to dramatically transform cities.Too much infrastructure?One of the most surprising findings is that cities may not need more infrastructure. Their existing infrastructure is already more than capable of getting everyone where they need to go when they need to get there.The Sensable City Lab developed Hubcab to track the use of taxi cabs in New York City. By tracking each trip and people who needed to hail cabs, it learned that often a taxi cab carrying just one passenger passes by numerous people who need to get to the same place, or at least a place nearby.A system that could bring together strangers so that they could share rides could reduce the infrastructure needed by 40%.Rassi says he only has the data for New York City, but doesn’t doubt that it’s true for many other cities as well.Removing bottlenecksOne of the most dramatic transformations is still years off as it relies on smart traffic controls and connected, autonomous vehicles.His simulation showed that even the smartest traffic signals today rapidly result in traffic jams as cars arrive at an intersection only to have to wait for many more to potentially cross or turn in front of them. The problem is that the intersection has no way to know where a driver wants to go, so even its optimal state is rarely optimized for anyone.A model with fully autonomous vehicles continues humming along even after increasing number of cars are added to the road, even though the intersection always gives priority to the vehicle that arrived first. With all the cars working together and responding to each other, the intersection looks like a swarming beehive, a flurry of activity with everyone constantly moving, yet nobody getting into anyone else’s way.Better human-machine experienceMuch closer on the horizon is something called the Copenhagen Wheel. It’s a replacement wheel for bicycles that makes biking around the city almost effortless.The replacement wheel contains sensors, a generator and a motor. As you slow down, the generator captures energy from your brakes. When you start to go up a hill, the motor kicks in to assist, making it feel like you’re still on flat ground. Sensors, meantime, monitor your effort feeding into an app that tracks your fitness.With the pilot project complete, the technology has been licensed and pre-orders are already being accepted.In addition to improving fitness levels, the Copenhagen Wheel makes it easier and attractive for more people to commute by bicycle, important in a city where nearly a third of commuters already bike.http://smartcitiescouncil.com/article/become-smarter-stretching-%E2%80%9...


HeadlineThe Leadership in Local Government eBook Series is a three-part series that focuses on helping communities achieve organizational excellence through leadership. By reading part one of the eBook Series, Managing Yourself in Local Government, you will learn: The different levels of managing yourself and personal effectiveness, including: communication and listening, collaboration and influencing, time management and planning, and effective strategies for local government leaders; and How to elevate your skills and get you one step closer to developing organizational excellence.Whether you're an early career professional or a veteran of local government, this eBook provides insight and understanding from various thought leaders in and outside of local government. These contributors provide great insight as to why managing yourself and personal effectiveness is an important step in achieving a successful community.http://icma.org/en/Article/106230/Free_eBook_Managing_Yourself_in_Local_...


Tips for Delivering Difficult FeedbackNo one likes to give difficult feedback to their employees, but done properly, it can be a way to help your team grow. Receiving good feedback is a gift because it helps us get better at our jobs. GovLoop offers some tips to make the tough conversations as productive as possible:• Don’t wait. “Feedback is best given right away, as soon as you notice a problem. That ensures the lesson will be fresh in both of your minds – plus, stockpiling criticisms from long ago can make you seem petty.”• Give difficult feedback in person. “Meeting in person does two things. First, it allows you both to better gauge responses. And second, it frames your feedback as a productive conversation, rather than a disciplinary action.”• Be specific. “Specific feedback gives your team member something to work on and move towards, whereas general criticism can have the opposite effect of making it seem like there’s nothing he can do to fix the problem. … Before your meeting, break down your general critiques into smaller, more actionable morsels of feedback.”• Don’t pile on the mistakes. “Because most of us tend to hold off on these conversations, it can be tempting to pile up everything to say all at once.” Instead, “try to distill multiple concerns into a single piece of fundamental behavioral feedback. Focusing your efforts on correcting a single bit of bad behavior – like a tendency to rush through without double checking her work – may clear up a host of other problems.”• Come up with a plan together. “Make a tough feedback conversation truly productive by treating it as a brainstorming session. Try to frame this meeting as a way of working together to solve a problem, rather than simply handing down your criticism from on high.”• Uncertain? Run things past HR. “If you’re just not sure what to say, try consulting with HR first before having the discussion. You may even want to practice what you’ll say, or role play in order to get your wording correct.”


HeadlineHOW TO TRANSITION TO A LEADERSHIP POSITIONOne of the most critical aspects to being an effective leader is to make the transition away from being an individual contributor to a facilitator and supporter of followers. If leaders do not see themselves in this light, and more importantly, do not act as such, then followers will have a difficult time seeing them as the leader.I read an advertisement email a couple of years ago for some leadership training and I was struck by the statistics that they reported regarding the “non-transitioned leader.” They reported that … “Today, 72.3 percent of new first line leaders are still approaching their work like individual contributors even those they have been promoted to a role where they are responsible for leading others.” Their statistics continued saying, “Every one of your leaders who fail to transition ‘significantly compromises’ the performance of approximately 12 people and, on average, the direct reports of non-transitioned leaders under-perform their peers led by transitioned leaders by 15 percent.”In my own experience I have found this to be correct, at least in the aspect of why some people in leader positions excel and why others flounder. Here are some considerations to think about regarding this transition process, which spans the end of the preparation phase through the early stages of holding a leadership position.Leaders must understand that a psychological shift needs to take place in your new leadership position. You need to start thinking, feeling and valuing differently as a leader. What are your leadership values? Have you take time to determine what those are? If you don’t know your own values, essentially your compass points for direction and boundaries in your leadership activities, how will others?Use the word “we” much more than the word “I”. Remember: it is no longer about you, it is about them. Your followers, your employees, are the people who are working to make your agency successful in accomplishing the mission.Begin measuring the successes of your followers as the indications of your efforts as their leader. Transitioned leaders know that when the team is succeeding the credit goes to the team but if the team is failing the leader will always receive the scrutiny. Frequently ask yourself this question, “Are your followers succeeding because of you or in spite of you”?Project comfort and confidence in the role of being a leader. Your attitude about the position and why you’re in it will make all the difference. Assume the job and not just the position. Continue to build and cultivate your integrity and credibility because now is not the time to relax your personal values.Lastly, avoid regressing to non-leader actions. Participating in office gossip or break room antics or, as my grandmother would say, “tom-foolery,” are often mistakes that new leaders make thinking that it will still show your followers that you’re human or “still one of them.” They do not see you as one of them anyway so it only reflects on your integrity and damages credibility. Stay above all of that and remind yourself that things are different now; you are the leader.https://www.govloop.com/community/blog/transition-leadership-position/?e...